webelieveyou:

skeptikhaleesi:

  • Abusers can do nice things for people they are not abusing.
  • Abusers can do nice things for people that they are abusing.
  • Abusers can otherwise seem like nice, caring, supportive people when they are not actively abusing someone.
  • It does not mean they’re not fucking abusers.

IMPORTANT.

You ever meet someone and something comes out of their mouth where you’re like, “… Oh my god. Please, lock yourself in your room and never interact with anyone. You are a danger to society. Please voluntarily segregate yourself from the rest of the world because your ideas becoming actions places everyone at risk. Please stay at least 100 feet away from me at all times. If you don’t respect that, I will probably be justified in using all means of self defense to keep myself and the world safe from your freakish and frightening world views and any possible acts you might perform in conjunction with them.”

the-treble:

Because that’s my thought process every time I meet someone who doesn’t understand consent.

(via webelieveyou)

"This dominant narrative surrounding the inevitability of female objectification and victimhood is so powerful that it not only defines our concepts of reality but it even sets the parameters for how we think about entirely fictional worlds, even those taking place in the realms of fantasy and science fiction. It’s so normalized that when these elements are critiqued, the knee-jerk response I hear most often is that if these stories did not include the exploitation of women, then the game worlds would feel too “unrealistic” or “not historically accurate”. What does it say about our culture when games routinely bend or break the laws of physics and no one bats an eye? When dragons, ogres and magic are inserted into historically influenced settings without objection. We are perfectly willing to suspend our disbelief when it comes to multiple lives, superpowers, health regeneration and the ability to carry dozens of weapons and items in a massive invisible backpack. But somehow the idea of a world without sexual violence and exploitation is deemed too strange and too bizarre to be believable."
– Tropes vs Women in Video Games, Women as Background Decoration: Part 2 (via femfreq)

"In a gender-equal world, Beyoncé could strut her stuff freely because she wouldn’t have to prove her intelligence, even if she was shimmying in a tight-fitting dress. Men have the liberty of shaking their hips without their intelligence being questioned, but women don’t."

Oh and another reminder for readers, rape is still heavily a gendered crime.
Anonymous

The College Bro’s Burden: Consent and Assault Cast a Shadow on Sexy Times

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I’m appreciative that young men [like the ones who created the “anti-rape” nail polish] want to curb sexual assault, but anything that puts the onus on women to “discreetly” keep from being raped misses the point. We should be trying to stop rape, not just individually avoid it.

If it were truly that simple, previous iterations of this same concept would have worked. Remember “anti-rape underwear”? Or the truly terrifying “Rapex” – a female condom that would insert tiny hooks into an assailant’s penis? You can’t really expect women to wear modern chastity belts or a real-life vagina dentata in order to be safe. That’s not trying to stop rape - it’s essentially arguing that some people getting raped is inevitable.

Even if a woman were to wear special nail polish or anti-rape underwear, or if she listens to common – but misplaced – advice about not getting drunk and always walking home in a group, all she’s supposedly ensuring is that she won’t be attacked. (And even then it’s not real security, because women who do all the “right” things get raped too) What about the girl at the same party who decided to have a few drinks that night? “So long as it isn’t me” isn’t an effective strategy to end rape.

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